August 11, 2020

John Edwards’ Biggest Mistake Was Lack Of Accountability, A Fatal Flaw For Leaders by Craig Chappelow

“Here’s my take: John Edwards made a mistake. And I’m not even talking about all the obvious ones. I’m talking about the moment he decided he was accountable to no one. When leaders, especially high-profile ones, crash and burn, lack of accountability is often the fatal flaw. Being accountable for our behavior (and its impact) is a cornerstone of leadership. Yet, time and time again leaders consider themselves immune to the rules. They believe they are too big to fall. And it could happen to any of us if we’re not careful.

Is your leadership “check engine” light on? Ask yourself these questions…”

Read the article by Craig Chappelow

Kevin Haney “Extraordinary Leadership: Ethical Leadership and Organizational Transformation”

“Cdr. Kevin Haney provided us a two-fold vision of leadership: what it takes to be a great leader and what it takes to be an ethical leader.

Sprinkled with personal stories of his experiences as a Midshipman, a Naval Aviator (including his time at the prestigious Fighter Weapons School (Top Gun)) with more than 850 carrier landings, as well as his more recent experiences educating and training our country’s future naval leaders at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD, he captivated his audience with actionable and coherent insights into leadership that provided real take-home value for our Chapter’s members.

Cdr. Haney is highly recommended and received a score of 9.8/10 on the event evaluation.” – Stephen Tansey, President, York Container Company and Education Officer 2011-12, Pennsylvania Chapter of the Young Presidents’ Organization (YPO)

See the presentation by Kevin Haney Extraordinary Leadership: Ethical Leadership and Organizational Transformation (PDF)

 

Peggy Noonan OpEd: America’s Crisis of Character

“People in politics talk about the right track/wrong track numbers as an indicator of public mood. This week Gallup had a poll showing only 24% of Americans feel we’re on the right track as a nation. That’s a historic low. Political professionals tend, understandably, to think it’s all about the economy—unemployment, foreclosures, we’re going in the wrong direction. I’ve long thought that public dissatisfaction is about more than the economy, that it’s also about our culture, or rather the flat, brute, highly sexualized thing we call our culture.  Now I’d go a step beyond that. I think more and more people are worried about the American character—who we are and what kind of adults we are raising…”

Read the rest of the OpEd by Peggy Noonan

After the firing: What does the Petrino case mean to Arkansas and college football?

“Yet again we fans of college football find ourselves in a quandary, albeit a false one.   We recognize that excellent coaches are tough to find.  Coaches such as Nick Saban, Paul Johnson, or Urban Meyer can have an immediate, dramatic impact on a program.  By going 21-5 over the past two seasons and beginning the upcoming season with a top ten ranking in the perennially tough SEC, Arkansas’ Bobby Petrino surely belonged in that very exclusive fraternity…”

Read the rest of the commentary by Joe Thomas, S-LS Founder and CEO

 

Advanced Executive Coaching Program

The demand for executive coaches is growing. How can you take advantage of the opportunities in the marketplace and make yourself more marketable? The University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business offers a new certificate program in Advanced Executive Coaching. This first-of-a kind program was developed by Smith school faculty, additional highly respected academics, and experienced executive coaches. The program is designed for coaches who want to take their executive coaching to the next level and are seeking a competitive advantage in the marketplace. “Coaching 21st Century Leaders: The Advanced Executive Coaching Program” will connect you with a network of leading experts in leadership development and executive coaching, introduce you to new methodologies, and provide opportunities to help you sharpen your coaching skills. This Advanced Executive Coaching Program has received the endorsement of the International Coach Federation (ICF) for 80 Continuing Coaching Education Units (CCEU).

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The Case of SSGT Robert Bales in Afghanistan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE       CONTACT:  Joe Thomas
DATE: 19 March 2012         PHONE:        (410) 212-5181

The Following statement may be attributed to Dr. Joseph J. Thomas, CEO, The Student-Leader Seminar:

 March 2012 Teachable Moment: The Case of SSGT Robert Bales in Afghanistan

US Soldier Accused in Killing of 16 Afghan Civilians. – The tragic news of the alleged actions of 38 year old US Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales came as a tremendous shock to the American public.  Recent reporting claims Bales left his operating base on the night of March 11, entered two Afghan villages and methodically went about shooting 16 civilians, including 9 children.  Afghan outrage, understandably, was immediate.  The international outcry was equally immediate.   Just over a week after the incident speculation as to what drove Bales to this act is rampant.  There’s been much discussion about his recent legal and relationship troubles, failed investments, and physical suitability for redeployment.  All of these details will be picked through in detail in the coming weeks and months.  One thing is certain at this point and that is US-Afghan relations will be forever altered.  The war may in fact be at a turning point.  The direction of America’s future in Afghanistan is impossible to predict.  Political and military leaders alike will attempt to mitigate the situation.  US service members and Westerners working in Afghanistan are at far greater risk as a result of this tragedy.  We can safely say that no possible good can come from this incident.  What can be safely claimed is that much needs to be done to prevent such incidents in future…”

[Read more…]

March 2012 Teachable Moment: The Case of SSGT Robert Bales in Afghanistan

“The tragic news of the alleged actions of 38 year old US Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales came as a tremendous shock to the American public.  Recent reporting claims Bales left his operating base on the night of March 11, entered two Afghan villages and methodically went about shooting 16 civilians, including 9 children…One thing is certain at this point and that is US-Afghan relations will be forever altered.  The war may in fact be at a turning point.  The direction of America’s future in Afghanistan is impossible to predict.  Political and military leaders alike will attempt to mitigate the situation.  US service-members and Westerners working in Afghanistan are at far greater risk as a result of this tragedy.  We can safely say that no possible good can come from this incident.  What can be safely claimed is that much needs to be done to prevent such incidents in future.”

Read the rest of the commentary by Joe Thomas, S-LS Founder and CEO

Do Fired Navy COs Suffer From ‘Bathsheba Syndrome’?

“The U.S. Navy has sacked more than 150 commanding officers for misconduct in the past 10 years. Five COs have already been fired this year, including the dismissal Monday of the commander of an amphibious transport dock that had not yet even been commissioned…”The Bathsheba Syndrome: The Ethical Failure of Successful Leaders,” published in a business journal in 1993, asserts that the ethical failure of powerful leaders is often not the result of an individual’s low morals, but the byproduct of success.”

Read the article from Stars and Stripes

Terry Burns and the New York Stock Exchange

When Terry was with Robertson & Co., he believed he was good trader. He consistently made profits for the firm, but like most other specialists, he didn’t win every time. As a result of this Terry struggled with whether or not he would be able to maintain his position. He could not figure out how to be as profitable as many of the other partners in his firm. This problem was shared by all the other members of Robertson &Co. who became part of the new firm. Some of them expressed that they were being pressured to circumvent the rules to better position themselves to make money. In other words, put themselves “in front of the public” (illegal trading).

Read the original article by Terry Burns (PDF)

Why Being Optimistic is a Moral Duty

“Maybe it’s because my aging eyes are failing me, but I’m beginning to see the brighter side of life, and not just my little life but Life. Optimism represents a phase change for me.”

Read the entire Chronicle of Higher Education Article by John Horgan